Summary of Research Articles

Summary of Research Articles

Quantitative and qualitative study designs are the two broad groups of research approaches. The two are distinct as they have different foundations that inform their existence. To illuminate on this distinctness are summaries of two studies, one of each research design. Of interest to this discussion is thus an overview of the main components of these research articles.

Caregiver Burden and Symptom Distress in End of Life Patients

The focus of Stephanie Crawford’s quantitative research is to determine the relationship that exists between the caregiver burden and palliative care patient’s symptom distress. It is a befitting example of a descriptive study design (correlation), in which the researcher has no influence on the environment (manipulation) that is common in experimental research designs.

Problem Statement

Over the past few years, there has been an evolution of the responsibilities held by caregivers offering services in the home settings of palliative patients. Consequently, this has led to an increased burden on these caregivers, causing an escalation of distress secondary to cancer symptoms in such patients. Lastly, a minimal number of studies that illustrate the association between caregiver burden and symptom distress in terminally ill patients. Thus, it is an issue worth addressing.

Statement of Purpose

The researcher, therefore, aims to establish the relationship between the palliative patients’ symptom distress and the caregiver burden in a home setting.

Research Questions/Hypothesis

Central to this study, is the research question (does a relationship between the caregiver burden and symptom distress in terminally ill patients exist?)

Study Methods

The study respondents were under obligation to complete scales (Adapted Symptom Distress Scale for patients and Caregiver Reaction Scale for caregivers). The two scales were necessary for assessing the levels of symptom distress and caregiver burden respectively. Finally, the researcher utilized Pearson correlations to determine the relationship between the variables (caregiver burden and symptom distress).

Key Findings

The study demonstrates that a significant correlation between the caregiver burden and symptom distress that occur in patients with terminal ill needs. However, the researcher does not explore the possible reasons for such a correlation.

 

 

Attitudes towards Aggression and Violence among Health Care Staff and Patients

In this qualitative approach, Wright and colleagues target to establish the attitude towards aggression and violence among patients and healthcare professionals in a hospital with high security. It is a case-study research design whose purpose is mainly providing an in-depth description of the respondents’ experiences.

Problem Statement

Currently, the paucity of studies that aim to establish the nursing staff and patient towards aggression and violence is deafening. Furthermore, the existent literature mainly illustrates the nature and frequency of violent and assault incidents. Evidently, these instances inspire a motivation for this study.

Statement of Purpose

The researcher aimed to find out the nursing staff and patients’ views on the control of aggression and violence in a high-security health facility.

Research Questions/Hypothesis

The primary research question for this study was; do the attitudes of nursing staff and patients affect the management of violence and aggression in high-security hospital settings?

Study Methods

The research utilized semi-structured interviews to collect pertinent information from eight male patients and ten nurses. The researcher then followed it up with a thematic analysis of the data.

Key Findings

The results of this study revolved around seven themes, in which the nursing staff and patients had both differed and agreed opinions on their effect on the management of violence and aggression. Conflicting attitudes were evident in the themes of medications, relationships, and construction of differences as sources of violence and aggression in high-security settings. On the contrary, both the patients and nurses wholesomely concurred to the fact that the establishment, identity, gender and environment stimuli play significant roles in the existence of aggression and violence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References

Andrews, S. C. (2001). Caregiver burden and symptom distress in people with cancer receiving hospice care. Oncology Nursing Forum, 28(9), 1469-1474.

Wright, K. M. et al. “A Qualitative Study of the Attitudes of Patients and Staff towards Violence and Aggression in a High-Security Hospital.” Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing 21.2 (2013): 184-188. Web. 8 Nov. 2016.

 

 

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