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Question: The crop foxtail millet (Setaria italica) has 3 different seed colors: brown, yellow, and white. …


The crop foxtail millet (Setaria italica) has 3 different seed colors: brown, yellow, and white. These colors are due to an interaction between 2 loci: (1) the G locus and (2) the D locus. A dominant allele from the G locus (G) will yield a brown pigment, while 2 recessive alleles from the G locus (gg) will yield a yellow pigment. A dominant allele from the D locus (D) allows the pigment to be deposited in the growing seed, while 2 recessive alleles from the D locus (dd) will prevent deposition of any pigment. Based on this information, please detail what would occur in the F, and F2 generation cross between a homozygous dominant brown seeded plant (GG DD) and a homozygous rece white seeded plant (gg dd). Be sure to state the ratios for both genotype and phenotype in generations. Finally, what phenomenon is on display here and what terms could we apply to two traits? s of a these 10. The wild strawberry plant (Fragaria vesca) exhibits 2 different fruit colors (red and white) under the control of 2 different loci. The red pigment found in most strawberries is imparted by pelargonidin- 3-glucoside (anthocyanin). Leucocyanidin (colorless) is converted into leucopelargonidin (colorless) by the enzyme leucoanthocyanidin dioxygenase (LDOX). Leucopelargonidin is then converted into pelargonidin-3-glucoside (anthocyanin; red in color) by the enzyme anthocyanidin 3-0- alucosyltransferase (UFGT). The LD locus encodes the LDOX enzyme where LD is the dominant allele, while ld is the nonfunctional recessive allele. The UG locus encodes the UFGT enzyme where UG is the dominant allele, while ug is the nonfunctional recessive allele. If we cross a plant that has the genotype uglug: LD/LD with a plant that has the genotype UG/UG Id/ld, what would be the genotypes and phenotypes of the resulting offspring (i.e. F1)? If we crossed the Fi generation to itself, what would be the possible genotypes and phenotypes observed in the F2 generation? Lastly, what phenomenon is on display here?

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The crop foxtail millet (Setaria italica) has 3 different seed colors: brown, yellow, and white. These colors are due to an interaction between 2 loci: (1) the G locus and (2) the D locus. A dominant allele from the G locus (G) will yield a brown pigment, while 2 recessive alleles from the G locus (gg) will yield a yellow pigment. A dominant allele from the D locus (D) allows the pigment to be deposited in the growing seed, while 2 recessive alleles from the D locus (dd) will prevent deposition of any pigment. Based on this information, please detail what would occur in the F, and F2 generation cross between a homozygous dominant brown seeded plant (GG DD) and a homozygous rece white seeded plant (gg dd). Be sure to state the ratios for both genotype and phenotype in generations. Finally, what phenomenon is on display here and what terms could we apply to two traits? s of a these 10. The wild strawberry plant (Fragaria vesca) exhibits 2 different fruit colors (red and white) under the control of 2 different loci. The red pigment found in most strawberries is imparted by pelargonidin- 3-glucoside (anthocyanin). Leucocyanidin (colorless) is converted into leucopelargonidin (colorless) by the enzyme leucoanthocyanidin dioxygenase (LDOX). Leucopelargonidin is then converted into pelargonidin-3-glucoside (anthocyanin; red in color) by the enzyme anthocyanidin 3-0- alucosyltransferase (UFGT). The LD locus encodes the LDOX enzyme where LD is the dominant allele, while ld is the nonfunctional recessive allele. The UG locus encodes the UFGT enzyme where UG is the dominant allele, while ug is the nonfunctional recessive allele. If we cross a plant that has the genotype uglug: LD/LD with a plant that has the genotype UG/UG Id/ld, what would be the genotypes and phenotypes of the resulting offspring (i.e. F1)? If we crossed the Fi generation to itself, what would be the possible genotypes and phenotypes observed in the F2 generation? Lastly, what phenomenon is on display here?

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